PDA

Voir la version complète : How many of you are Mac users?



Altered_Ego
05/02/2007, 18h49
For the past few months I've been looking seriously at the new Intel iMacs. I'm really thinking of making the move from PCs to Macs. Much of this depends on whether I finally get a regular income.

I mainly use Poser & DAZ|Studio. I'm still trying to learn Hexagon and Carrara 5 Pro.

I decided to get ready just in case I'm able to buy the iMac later this year.

I went over to DAZ, and downloaded the Mac versions of all my Poser content. And I downloaded the Mac versions of Carrara 5 Pro, Hexagon, and DAZ|Studio.

DAZ is nice because they don't charge you extra to get the Mac versions of their software.

eFrontier will not be so kind. I must use one serial number to get either the Mac or PC version of Poser. eFrontier did give away Poser 5 for free awhile ago, and I got it. So I could still end up getting both a PC and Mac version of Poser.

So how many of you use Macs?!

Couerl
05/02/2007, 19h27
Hi Ron, I moved this thread to the misc. because it doesn't pertain to Carrara.

Thanks for understanding.

Steven

Thomas
05/02/2007, 20h17
For your information, 17% of visitors were on mac this last month.

psaldari
05/02/2007, 20h44
I mainly use Poser & DAZ|Studio. I'm still trying to learn Hexagon and Carrara 5 Pro.

I decided to get ready just in case I'm able to buy the iMac later this year.

I went over to DAZ, and downloaded the Mac versions of all my Poser content. And I downloaded the Mac versions of Carrara 5 Pro, Hexagon, and DAZ|Studio.

DAZ is nice because they don't charge you extra to get the Mac versions of their software.

eFrontier will not be so kind. I must use one serial number to get either the Mac or PC version of Poser. eFrontier did give away Poser 5 for free awhile ago, and I got it. So I could still end up getting both a PC and Mac version of Poser.

So how many of you use Macs?!

Hi, Mac user here.
If you plan to swith to Intel mac verify if the software you want to use is in Universal Binarys (UB), this because all the old software is compiled for work in the PowerPC (PPC) processors (G3, G4, G5) and some softwares (like 3D softwares) not works under "rosetta" (rosetta is an PPC - Intel code traslator).
The UB software have a possibility to run on the old Macs and on the new Macs.
For Carrara exist a 5.1 UB version.
For Hexagon 2 no.

For the others (like poser) I don't know.

Cheers
Paolo

Altered_Ego
05/02/2007, 21h04
Hi Ron, I moved this thread to the misc. because it doesn't pertain to Carrara.

Thanks for understanding.

Steven

Steven, in some ways, the thread does pertain to Carrara, since I recently bought it. However, I understand your decision.
:shiny:

The Applications I currently use the most are: Poser, DAZ|Studio, Carrara & Hexagon. I've already gotten the Universal Binary versions of DAZ|Studio, Carrara & Hexagon. I still want to buy Poser 7. (As portrayed in the original post.)

I had an idea that many members of this forum have Macintoshes... and I love to hear your input and insights.

Bear in mind that I have done some extensive research.. and Macs just keep looking better!

sadot
05/02/2007, 23h41
hi my first computer ever was a

Macintosh Performa 745 22Mhz 4 MbRam 256KbVideo 250 Mb HD
then...

PowerMac 7200 90Mhz 128Mb Ram 4 Mb Video 2GB HD
updatet to..
PowerMac 7200 G3 500 Mhz 986Mb Ram ATI9200 128MbVideo 8-16Gb 9K HD

iBook G3 366 Mhz ATI 4MbVideo 20GbHd

PowerMac G5 Quad -the one in my signature

Now i just open my MacPro :w00t:

OscarX
06/02/2007, 00h31
What is the advantage for you to move from Win to MAC?
I am Win user, but I am just curious.

Altered_Ego
06/02/2007, 02h11
Well, I want something new! I want to avoid all the pitfalls of the Windows operating systems... I want to avoid Vista like the plague.

The new Macs feature an Intel processor, and can even run Windows XP software, with the help of Bootcamp.

Besides, the iMacs are sweet! They take up very little desk space.

Oh, they're just great computers.

medeamajic
06/02/2007, 12h05
I have heard of more problems for OS X users than Windows users on these forums. I thought the Mac OS only supported Open GL up to 1.4.

You can get great custom built PC with XP installed. Vista is out there but you do not have to use it.

OscarX
06/02/2007, 18h23
"Well, I want something new!"
That would do it for me as well. It could be good to play with OS X for a change. The MAC looks used to be also far better, now with Sony and few others heavily stepping into the design area WIN users have also some cool models to choose from. Last time I had seen Sony laptop in store (it was all white) I actually thought it is a MAC.
But the apps for video and DVD (FC, Mot2, DVD SP..) on MAC are sweet-sweet and not that horribly expensive (actually net-net I think a pro solution on MAC would be cheaper than on WIN), if I was PRO in this field I would buy MAC just for them.

See you know WINE, the virtualization of win API for Linux. The same can be done for MAC, even more on iMAC so win apps can run on MAC directly, without speed issues, without booting or a separate WIN emulator window. But Apple would not allow the wild WIN apps directly on MAC, never, ever. And messing with dual boot or slow emulator is not something appealing. But if you don't need any WIN apps, go for it, could be fun!
I stay on XP and stay away from Vista, hehehe, I installed it on one of my Vista ready laptop and now I have the benefit of 2 times slower file copy and none of my OpenGL 3D apps working correctly. Evolution in computing!

Altered_Ego
06/02/2007, 19h34
Apple allows you to install Windows XP on the Intel Mac. You use Bootcamp to accomplish the goal. When your Mac boots, you choose to boot in Windows XP or OS/X.

ap-brian
07/02/2007, 00h28
theres a mac program call "crossover".You can run several Win apps without the need to install windows! I even got Carrara 5.1 and vue 6 extreem to run and render (grafic display was corupped though but the render was fine). The next version of crossover might even run more apps. http://www.codeweavers.com/products/cxmac/

Altered_Ego
07/02/2007, 01h23
Thanks for the info.

I already have downloaded the Mac versions of Hexagon, Carrara 5 Pro and DAZ|Studio.

So I will already be at a good starting point if I do buy the iMac later this year.

bwtr
07/02/2007, 01h36
From what I read, the majority of people with Macs have more bugs and difficulties with a huge range of apps than do Pc users.

If you are watching carefully, it seems pretty clear that more and more app makers are not going to make mac versions in the future. That Mac has introduced the crossover I think confirms that.

This so called problem with WindowsXP (and IE) I find so very strange. I don't have a single worry. Ok at times it's a bit slow. but thats my fault because my system is overloaded.

The beta of Vista has been great to see and use - it really is brilliant- BUT I think there is a problem relating to Open GL that has to be resolved.

Anyway, must astute computer people usually wait for the first SR before they buy don't they?

rickei
07/02/2007, 03h33
What???
do you know what you are talking about Brian?
If you are basing software issues on a Mac by these forums, then you need to look elsewhere. Hex 2 is problematic on a Mac. As opposed to a PC which it runs flawlessly on

As far as "app makers" I'm not sure what you mean, who has quit making Mac apps???...I must not be looking close enough.


The reason for crossover/ or bootcamp is because you can. Apple has gained a new fan base from it's ipod business, and this gives people the option of buying a new computer and still being able to run their "old" software, with buying a new everything

As for the fact that they now use intell chips that is bacause Motorola could not make a G5 chip as fast as was required by Apple without massive heat build up. Intell developed the duo core and made it possible for Apple to produce g5 laptops, that didn't singe the hair off your legs. Thats why there were no g5 ibooks prior to the intell chip.


"but thats my fault because my system is overloaded."
What does you system being overloaded have to do with slow browser performance? Must be a Windows thing???

To answer Ron's question:
Yes I am a Mac user
here is my history of Machines

Apple IIc 1978
Apple IIe ~1980
Lisa '83
Macintosh plus ~ '88
Mac LC630 ( Pizza Box)
2 Performa's a520 and a 632( i think)
Centris 610
several Quadra's
PowerPC 8500
PowerPC 9500
G4
My current Mac is a G5

oh I forgot to mention the Powerbooks
Duo 280c
3400
G3
Titanium G4

I have never bought a new machine because my old one died, I have never had a virus, and I have NEVER, had to have a machine serviced.... and Yes I am a FANBOY
BTW: I don't hate Windows... I've never used it, It could be great, and I have just been missing out for the past 28 years

Altered_Ego
07/02/2007, 03h46
Thanks for sharing your experience, rickei.

That means a lot to me.

bwtr
07/02/2007, 04h33
In reply to Reckei,--I think we must follow different forums. But any way---
Why would any app make maker --in the future--unnecessarily produce two forms of an app (with the risks of adding problems in the conversion) when one version will surfice?

Maybe there will be a PC "converter" soon so that those who design in Mac form wont have to do a PC version?--Fine by me.

In the relation to the "slow" bit--I am at fault in that I load a lot of my new stuff directly into the app (say Carrara--Browser) rather than an "outside" accesable file. If you can do that and not slow down the opening of Carrara on Mac I best think again!

ApI
07/02/2007, 05h51
BTW: I don't hate Windows... I've never used it, It could be great, and I have just been missing out for the past 28 years


Trust me. You're not missing anything.

I swtiched 7 years ago and have never looked back. I still have to use Windows at work, which is annoying because I spend as much time trying to make Windows work the way it should as I do being productive. On the upside, I can take work home and actually get something done there on the Mac, and cross-platform file format compatibility is not even an issue these days.

LoneGunman
07/02/2007, 11h33
To answer Ron's question:
Yes I am a Mac user
here is my history of Machines

Apple IIc 1978
Apple IIe ~1980
Lisa '83
Macintosh plus ~ '88
Mac LC630 ( Pizza Box)
2 Performa's a520 and a 632( i think)
Centris 610
several Quadra's
PowerPC 8500
PowerPC 9500
G4
My current Mac is a G5

oh I forgot to mention the Powerbooks
Duo 280c
3400
G3
Titanium G4



You got your dates bit wrong...:p

Apple IIc was first released in April 24 1984 (Lisa and IIe 1983), 2 months later I got my first Apple IIe, cuz it got cheaper.

British ZX series (Sinclair) were so popular in the Europe at that time that I could not ignore it any longer , so I diched Apple for a cheaper ZX thing an bunch of games included with it, it was hell of the ride for sure :hi:

rickei
07/02/2007, 16h21
I was tyring to remember those dates, I actually started in 78 with the Apple ][ or II
i think I had a "II plus" at some point in time...now that I think about it.
My father was a school principal, and the school got new apples whenevr they came out, but... no one at the school even knew how to turn them on. So he got permission to take them home, to try and figure it out. Thats where i came in.

Hehe I almost forgot about the Sinclair... not that big in the states. We had Tandy

Didn't Sinclair make all kinds of gadgets?? I don't remember if that was them or not. I guess i could look it up.

Altered_Ego
07/02/2007, 17h35
I went through the Commodore Line, until Amiga arrived.

Then I got an Atari 520 ST... a "Mac wannabe." That proved immensely frustrating.

Then I went to the PC world, and started building my own computers.

medeamajic
08/02/2007, 13h55
If you can build your own PC why would you want a Mac?

I prefere to build a PC with the OS, MOBO, Video card and peripherals that I want rather than buy what Dell, HP or Apple wants to sell me. I could not have my hot swappable bays (CD-ROM bay) or my Internal card reader (floppy drive bay) if I opted for a Mac.I would rather see you buy a laptop than an Imac. An I mac is just a laptop that can not run on batteries.

Dann-O
08/02/2007, 14h22
I have been looking into gettign back on the mac. After reading about bootcamp and knowing that I can get many of my PC apps workign on the mac. What I liek is that there are a few mac only apps that are powerful and sweet. Pixels animation studio which I ran the forunner to it on my powermac back in teh 90's. It is basically nurbs modelign and aniamation rigging and all for about 150$ and to boot ther eis a new app called Cheetah which is about the same price but more poly based. There is nothign on the PC that is close to the price with the features.

Some links. http://www.cheetah3d.com/
http://www.pixels3d.com/

So that is why I wanted to switch but I really need to be able to use PMG messiah with it or else I would just get a mac mini and play with these and get a PC to handle the big stuff.

To tell the truth there are thigns I don't like abotu both platforms but that is what you got.

ApI
08/02/2007, 17h24
If you can build your own PC why would you want a Mac?

Well, the ability to run OS X would be one good reason.


I could not have my hot swappable bays (CD-ROM bay) or my Internal card reader (floppy drive bay) if I opted for a Mac.


Yeah, I wish Apple had made the MacPro drives hot-swappable like they did with the XServe. At least there are third-party options for making it work, for those who feel they need that capability and like to tinker with their systems.

Altered_Ego
08/02/2007, 18h33
I personally don't see any benefit to hot-swapping drives.

Over the past couple years, I've purchased a few external hard drives. That makes installation so much easier. And I can hook them up to different computers quite easily.

MimiSoliel
08/02/2007, 19h59
I'm new here. About 24 hours. I admire your work.

I've been a Mac user since 1990. I've been at jobs where I was forced to work on or deal with PCs using Microsoft operating systems. A royal nightmare compared to the organic flow and long-lasting dependability of a Macintosh.

I'm getting a MacBook Pro next month.

medeamajic
09/02/2007, 10h50
I am not saying there is anything wrong with the the Imac or OS X. I was infact asking Altered Ego the question since he can build PCs. I can understand the purchase of an Imac if altered Ego wanted to use Final Cut Pro.

medeamajic
09/02/2007, 10h56
I personally don't see any benefit to hot-swapping drives.

Over the past couple years, I've purchased a few external hard drives. That makes installation so much easier. And I can hook them up to different computers quite easily.

Installing a SATA or IDE drive with OS-X or XP is easy. Many PCs have external SATA but I don't think the Imacs do. Fire Wire and USB do not have the transfer speeds of SATA or IDE making editing of HD video hard to do. It can play one layer easy enough.

Altered_Ego
09/02/2007, 17h15
I've actually grown tired of building my own PCs all the time... that usually comes after I've had some hardware problems.

I don't like the way many PC makers skimp on hardware..

I like the look of Macs.. I may eventually look at some of the fancier software such as Final Cut.. It depends on when/if I have extra money.

Right now, I'm just a hobbiest who wants to get into making videos for my own amusement.. as well as using Poser, etc.

steama
09/02/2007, 18h25
:hi: Both are decent choices. Both platforms have their unique problems, compromises and strengths. I have used both over the years and see a lot of value in both.

It really just comes down to what you wish to use. I can't see any strongly compelling advantages of one platform over the other just different issues.

Right now I prefer using Windows.

medeamajic
09/02/2007, 22h42
I've actually grown tired of building my own PCs all the time... that usually comes after I've had some hardware problems.

I don't like the way many PC makers skimp on hardware..

I like the look of Macs.. I may eventually look at some of the fancier software such as Final Cut.. It depends on when/if I have extra money.

Right now, I'm just a hobbiest who wants to get into making videos for my own amusement.. as well as using Poser, etc.



If you have problems building your own PCs and are not that good at it than I can understand why you might opt for a Mac. Macs are not bad for the price now days but Keep in mind a Mac is the same as an HP, Dell or Sony. PC makers do not skimp out any more than Apple would. If you spend $399.99 on a Dell you get a cheap integrated hunk of junk. If you spend $2500,00 on a PC you will get dual SLI and a MOBO that supports dual CPUs along with SATA RAID. The Imac is OK. My Uncle just bought one. It is his first computer. After seeing my PC he realizes the Imac is just a toy. My uncle is getting into digital photography, video and 3-D animation. He likes my internal card reader and wished his I Mac had one. He likes the fact the my computer has expansion slots so I can instal high end audio cards or any generic PCI Express video card I want. I showed him my cheap $29.99 Samsung LightScribe drive and told him the Imac will not work with generic OEM PC desktop parts. He still likes his Imac but he understands it is very cheap and chinsy system compared to what I have. I showed him my Dell laptop and showed him the laptop is about as upgradable as his Imac. This was his first computer and when he buys another he will be much more cautious. My system was a lot less expensive but at the same time a lot more power full. I showed him my dual monitor set up. The Imac can run dual monitors but you are stuck with the Imac monitor as is a laptop stuck with it's monitor. The reason for this post is to say I can not image anyone who custom builds there own computers opting for an Imac. An Apple tower maybe. Also the Imac is not going to be a higned end system. I admit it will work for your needs but my system will blow it away hands down and so could a $1300.00 HP or Dell. The Imac looks nice but it is not a Class-A system. Steama, I agree with you. XP and OS X both work but to get an Imac because you think PCs are cheap makes no sense. I amdit the Apple Pro tower systems rock.

ApI
10/02/2007, 19h02
Well, the iMac is not marketed as a top-end system. It's part of Apple's consumer line, geared toward average home users, cubicle farmers, or those doing publishing or web design but who don't necessarily need top-shelf systems.

If you spend $2,500 (the figure you mention above as enough to get a top-shelf PC) on a Mac, you get a tower housing a two 2.66 GHz dual-core Xeon processors with dual, independent 64-bit frontside buses, 1GB of DDR2 RAM (expandable to 16GB), GeForce 7300 (though this can easily be replaced or upgraded), 250 GB of SATA storage (with four drive bays for additional expansion), three additional PCI slots, etc. etc. etc.

And all of that comes in an elegant design with no tangled messes of wires or jumbles of parts that look like Dr. Frankenstein cobbled them together from whatever was laying around the laboratory. Plus you can triple-boot into OS X, Windows (even Vista), and Linux if you want.

Man, if I were gonna drop $2500 on a system today, it'd be probably be that one. It's also great that they don't depreciate in value as much as PCs seem to. In a few years I could sell it on eBay for close to what I paid for it new, and I could even keep my external card reader. :beer:

medeamajic
10/02/2007, 19h38
ApI,

My post was for altered ego. It was odd that he stated PCs were cheap but he wants to buy an Imac. The Apple Pro is decent.

Apples will not retain value like they once did. The Price of Intel MOBOs and CPUs will drop in price faster than IBM or Motorola did in the past.

PC have been doing dual boot for decades. Keep in mind OS X is Unix/Linux based of Debain. The OS X should run a generic PC not be keyed into Apple only hardware.

I think my system looks better than the Mac Tower but that is a personal choice. I do not like the Mac Tower Look myself. I also do not like the fact that there are no generic expansion bays.

ApI
10/02/2007, 20h08
Apples will not retain value like they once did. The Price of Intel MOBOs and CPUs will drop in price faster than IBM or Motorola did in the past.


Well, I think there's more to value retention than just current CPU prices. Besides, we mustn't forget that Mac CPUs can be upgraded in various ways. With the towers it's obviously easier than with the consumer models, but even on iMac the processor can be upgraded (though breaking the heat seal voids the warranty unless the operation is performed by an Apple Certified System Technician and probably shouldn't be done on a model that is still under Applecare protection).



PC have been doing dual boot for decades. Keep in mind OS X is Unix/Linux based of Debain. The OS X should run a generic PC not be key into Apple only hardware.

Macs have been doing dual boot for some time as well, though previously it was simply a matter of Mac OS and Linux. Now we have the triple boot option with Windows thrown into the mix.

BTW, OS X is not a Linux derivative of Debian. Darwin and the Mach kernel are derivatives of FreeBSD. They were, I understand, pioneered at NeXT and then brought back to Apple when Jobs returned.



I think my system looks better than the Mac Tower but that is a personal choice. I do not like the Mac Tower Look myself.

Yeah, to be honest I'm not keen on it myself. I prefer the look of the older G4 PowerMacs. It'd be sweet if they resurrected that basic design with the brushed metal material of the new Mac Pro towers instead of the plastic they used before.

But mainly I was referring to the internal design. One thing that's always turned me off about PCs, especially ones constructed at home, is that they so often end up with tangles of wires and cables going every which way inside. And some people even feel the need to get windowed cases to show it off! If they're going to do that, they ought to at least get some cable ties and try to neaten things up. Heck, I even knew a guy who built a really awesome PC, which would have been great, but when he moved it from the workbench to his desk, one of the cables got caught in the CPU fan and he ended up cooking his processor.

I really like the way Apple has avoided all that with its cable-free internal design model. It's nice and clean and easy to work in.


I also do not like the fact that there are no generic expansion bays.

Yeah, that's true. It's limited to the four HD bays and two optical drive bays. Still, if one really needs to use third-party equipment, one could always get a cheap external enclosure and hook it up to one of the USB 2.0, Firewire 400, or Firewire 800 ports.

That's how I added a DVD burner to my ancient Revision A iMac. When I upgraded the processor from the 233Mhz G3 that came with it to a 500Mhz G3 (blazing speeds, I tell ya :shiny: ) I also added a daughtercard with two Firewire ports. I got a firewire enclosure for ten bucks at the flea-market, and put my NES DVD burner in it.

I still use that old iMac as a backup file server here at the house. Had to replace the HD (it only came with 4 gigs), so now I have 200 gigs of backup space here on my network. It's currently running OS X 10.3. Still pretty useful for a box made back in 1998.

Altered_Ego
10/02/2007, 21h48
I stated my reasons for wanting a Mac (iMac) when I started the thread.

On the whole, I've had very little trouble assembling my own PCs.

In fact, I only really had trouble with one that was first assembled by a local computer shop. It was my only PC from a shop, and it had problems from the start. I gave it to my ex-wife when I moved out of her house. She tried to work on it, and burnt out the CPU. Good riddance.

I've done my research, at the Apple store, reading Apple-related reviews, reading the forums.

The new line of iMacs compares very favorably with similarly configured PCs.

Yes, the Super Mac looks good because it allows more expandability than the iMacs. But it does have a hefty price tag.

At this point, it looks like I might have much more money to spend, even after I've put away half of it into savings.

So it's entirely possible that I'll end up with a new desktop and a notebook computer as well.

ApI
10/02/2007, 23h37
So it's entirely possible that I'll end up with a new desktop and a notebook computer as well.


If you end up with a MacBook Pro, the matte screen is recommended over the glossy for graphic work. My wife has one, but she's an early adopter. There have been a few issues with it; the Sony-manufactured battery had to be sent back, for example. I'm sure they've ironed out most of the kinks by now. She probably could have held out for a regular MacBook for her needs, though.

Altered_Ego
11/02/2007, 00h05
Thanks for the tip. I do believe the Matte screen is the default...

I read that the glossy screen is liable to have way too much glare reflection.

Right now, the MacBook Pro, with 2 Gig of memory looks pretty nifty to me.

The question is whether I can afford to go "All the way," and get a Mac Pro and a MacBook Pro.

I do like the convenience of the iMacs, with their FrontRow and remote. (To say nothing of taking up less desktop room.)

To me, it's a matter of price versus priorities. I'm not making any money with my computer... I'm just learning, entertaining, and writing free tutorials for my fans.
:happy:

medeamajic
11/02/2007, 05h24
I told my uncle to scrap the IMac and just get a laptop next time. That is what he planes on doing. A 19" Imac for 599.99 would be OK but for $1,700.00 you might as well get a laptop.

ApI
11/02/2007, 06h00
I told my uncle to scrap the IMac and just get a laptop next time. That is what he planes on doing. A 19" Imac for 599.99 would be OK but for $1,700.00 you might as well get a laptop.


Which one did he get for $1700? The 24-inch? That'd make a great media center. Mount it on the wall, get a bluetooth keyboard and mouse set, run a TV signal to it, and you're good to go.

ApI
11/02/2007, 06h01
I do like the convenience of the iMacs, with their FrontRow and remote. (To say nothing of taking up less desktop room.)



I think they all come with FrontRow and the remote these days. I know the MacBook Pro does.

Altered_Ego
11/02/2007, 06h49
But the Mac Pro desktop doesn't have it.

medeamajic
11/02/2007, 11h31
Which one did he get for $1700? The 24-inch? That'd make a great media center. Mount it on the wall, get a bluetooth keyboard and mouse set, run a TV signal to it, and you're good to go.

I think he paid a little over $1,800.00 at CompUSA and got the 20". It was about 6 months ago.I can connect dual 34" LCDs to my system but you can do that with a $900.00 Dell or Sony system. One thing my uncle likes about my system is the Dual 19" monitors. I told my unlce it will be hard to match his LCD 100% for contrast and image qulaity if he wants dual monitor out put. I admit they do not have to match 100% but it helps.

Paul Rego
11/02/2007, 11h47
My machine of choice is the "iMac".

I started with the Apple ][+ in 1981. Around '83 or '84 I worked for a company which wrote radio station software for the Apple ///.

I've also owned an Apple //c, a MacPlus, a Macintosh Centris (or was it a Quadra), a few Macintosh Performas and I'm currently on my 4th iMac. Not because they keep breaking but because I own a Macintosh training, troubleshooting, consulting business and I have to keep up with the latest technologies. (I was also the local Apple Rep for several years.) Since I deal with beginners, they use iMacs.

I love the iMac line. From my experience, in dealing with Apple's "consumer-level" Macs (iMac, eMac, Mac mini, iBook, MacBook) and their "professional" line (MacPro, MacBook Pro, PowerMac, etc.), I have found the "consumer" line to have "relatively" fewer problems. They're all not perfect but by the time the leading-edge technologies filter their way down to the "consumer" line, "most" of those problems (if any) have usually been worked out.

I have a Revision "B" iMac G5, 2GHz with 2GB RAM. I added "name brand" RAM (not "generic" RAM) in "matched pairs" (2, 1GB modules which are identical). When matched pairs are used, the iMac uses a 128-bit data path, instead of the normal 64-bit data path -- which allows it to work with large files faster.

Altered_Ego... Since you're going to buy your iMac "later this year", you shouldn't have any problem. For anyone wanting to buy a new Mac in the near future, I would be sure it has Mac OS X 10.5, "Leopard", installed on the hard drive -- not just included in the box. This means the hardware should be fairly well optimized to work with ALL the features of Leopard and the included "iLife" suite of programs (if Apple continues to include them). Of course, the current iMacs offer Desktop-spanning (2 monitors). My current model does not.

I have seen some of the Macintosh "rumor" sites mention that the next iMacs "may" allow up to 4GB of RAM. (Right now, the 3 top-end iMac models only allow up to 3GB.) This will probably mean we'll be able to add matched pairs once again.

My iMac came with "Tiger", Mac OS X 10.4, and it is one sweet computer. I use these programs:
* Carrara 5 Pro,
* Macromedia Fireworks (now owned by Adobe) for raster / vector art,
* Photoshop Elements 4 (I don't use the full Photoshop because I simply don't want all the extra baggage it brings with it.),
* The Print Shop 2,
* Freeway Express 4 (by Softpress) for web page creation,
* FileMaker Pro 8,
* Macromedia Freehand,
* InDesign CS2 (by Adobe) for page-layout,
* iWork (by Apple) for presentations and page-layout,
* and of course, all the included "iLife" programs (iPhoto, iDVD, iMovie HD, GarageBand and iWeb (which I just started using to make blogs),
* (I do have other programs but you get the idea.)

I use my iMac to:
* Create and maintain web pages for 2 different organizations,
* Create and maintain my blog,
* Create 3D art,
* Create songs and record instruments, via MIDI, directly into my iMac,
* Edit photos for a PDF newsletter,
* I download old, public domain movies from "archive.org" and, with a $19 adapter, I connect my iMac to my TV so i can watch those movies in a different room,
* In September, I published my own Macintosh book.

Please don't take this as bragging. There are a lot of talented people on PolyLoop and many of you have done far more than I could dream of. I just want to show that the iMac is a very powerful and flexible computer -- and it is NOT a toy!

My iMac is fast and very stable. I can't remember ever having any real problems with it.

I also have an Epson printer which allows me to print directly onto CDs and DVDs -- very handy. (In my experience over the years, Epson has reliably proven to "be there' whenever Apple comes out with a new Operating System version. I have found that other companies, epecially HP, will issue a statement saying you won't be able to print until they create new Drivers.

From what "I" have seen over the years, the buying advice for PCs (and what works "best" for them) is sometimes different for Macs (and what works "best" for them) -- printers is one such example.

Anyway, just my 2-cents worth.

rickei
11/02/2007, 17h04
Paul,

You are right about third party hardware for the Mac.
Epson and Logitech, are two very fine examples of companies that have developed Mac Specific products over the years. I am a very loyal customer of both. They have not just "ported" a "driver" but have made use of "extensions" and "control pannels", as well as other os specific things like Colorsync. I think a lot of that is in the past, since USB(no more ADB plugs) and OSX, but it is still an issue in some cases

rickei
11/02/2007, 17h14
Hey Ron,

i did want to mention that you should checkout the refurbished Macs on Apple's site. You can save quite a bit, and you still get AppleCare and all that good stuff. Also consider taking a class or 2 at your local College or Tech School, to take advantage of Apples educational discount... as well as most any new software you need

medeamajic
11/02/2007, 23h54
Paul Rego,

I could understand a person wanting to try a Mac system but I do not agree with comment about the PCs skimping on hardware. A $1999.99 dollar Dell or Sony will be a Class A system. The $1999.99 Imac only has a Nvidia 7300 GT and a 2.133 CPU. The Imac is a toy in my opinon because it can not be upgraded like a Generic ATX PC. The Imacs have no External SATA ports and you can not buy a PCI Express card to add them. You can not just buy a generic 8800 Nvida Card and pop it in. That is why I consider them a toy. I am not saying they do not work. The Imac is more expensive than a genric ATX PC becuase of the propritary parts. I think my unlce will opt for an Apple laptop next time. If your Imac gets a scratch on the screen you have to shell out some cash for repairs. I can just get a new monitor that same day. There are reasons why I consider the Imac a toy. You may not agree. The Mac Pro Tower is a different story.
On a side note. I consider my laptop a toy compared to the PC I custom built.